Knowing Bordeaux Part 3 – The Right Bank

Let’s venture to the wine region where Merlot is the most respected and regarded grape. It’s back to Bordeaux.  In Part 1 we went over the basic geography of Bordeaux and in Part 2 we focused on the Medoc and the Cabernet driven wines produced there. You may recall that the wine growing area to the east of the Dordogne and Gironde is known as the Right Bank. fotoBORDELAIS-mapa-post-sobre-cata-Bordeaux-1140x904It’s here that Merlot is the star and the wines are among the finest anywhere in the world.  If that’s surprising to you because you think Merlot is just a simple, easy-drinking every day wine perhaps it’s because Merlot has gotten a bad rap in the US. For a while Merlot was the go-to bar pour and a lot of it was simple and flabby, reinforced by the movie Sideways, from which the reputation of Merlot has had difficulty recovering.

Thankfully we have the wines of Bordeaux to celebrate this grape. Recall that in Bordeaux we don’t typically find single variety wines. The noble grapes of Bordeaux are blended together in the wine. So in the Right Bank, which is also known as the Libournais, Merlot is usually the predominant grape in the blend, with some Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot and Malbec varying in the mix. What this gives us is Bordeaux that is more approachable than their cousins on the Left Bank, those dominated by Cabernet. But they are also decidedly French.  By that I mean that the wine is less fruit forward than most American and other new world offerings. They might seem a bit leaner to your taste if you’re used to big juicy wines from California. But just wait – they have nuance and texture that make them awesome food wines.

When shopping for Right Bank wines you’ll be looking for the appellation names based on the villages in the region and the specific producing chateau. I know that can get confusing, especially since St. Emilion is the only area with a distinction between Premier Grand Cru and Grand Cru. Frankly I don’t worry too much about that. I like to drink wines from all throughout the Right Bank – from St. Emilion, Pomerol, Lalande de Pomerol, Lussac, Fronsac, Cotes du Borg and so on.  Like any wine choice I look for quality and value and try to do a bit of homework, relying on friends, retailers and my own sip experiences.

There are some very famous, and pricey wines from the Right Bank. Chateau Petrus of Pomerol is one of the most highly regarded and expensive wines in the world – and it is all Merlot. If you have an extra $3,800 lying around you can pick up a bottle of the 2010 at wine.com! The Wine Advocate gave it a 100 rating.

Chateau Cheval Blanc, Chateau Pavie, Chateau Angelus and Chateau Ansone are right up there in price and prestige with the best of the Medoc First Growths. It has been a rare treat when I have had a taste of any of these! Mostly I try to stay in the Every Day or perhaps the Guest Sip price range.

So if you are looking to expand your wine horizons, and capture some of what Merlot is really all about, head for the Right Bank of Bordeaux. Here are some Sips to point the way.

Every Day Sip
2013 Chateau Cap de Faugeres Castillon Cotes de Bordeaux $16
2012 Chateau Garraud Lalande de Pomerol, 2014 $25
2012 Chateau d’Aiguilhe Castillon Cotes de Bordeaux $25

Guest Sip
2014 Chateau Sansonnet Saint Emilion $30
2012 Chateau Barde Haut Saint Emilion $30
2014 Chateau Berliquet Saint Emilion $35

Splurge Sip
Chateau Canon La Gaffeliere St. Emilion, 2014 $60

Wine Memories – Sipping Special Places

Let’s do some traveling together.  We just returned from a vacation overseas and we captured the memories in pictures and videos as well as locking special moments into the memory bank. Isn’t savoring new experiences and building the memories why we travel? We have been blessed with many opportunities to fill the memory bank with special times involving wine so I thought it would be fun to highlight some of them, especially since they also offer insight into wine with food and wine with different places. In a way this is wine pairing at the source! Cue the traveling music please…

  • New Zealand may be known for lamb but did you know about the green lipped mussels? These are large, tender and flavorful mussels you can enjoy either hot or chilled. I like ‘em chilled and there’s nothing better than sitting around the table like we did in Blenheim – drinking some Dog Point Sauvignon Blanc and sharing a heap of green lipped mussels. The tart and herbaceous Sauvignon Blanc is an ideal match to the soft texture and slight taste of the sea. In the memory bank.
  • More seafood? The most enjoyable bottle of Pinot Grigio I can remember was sipped with a bucket of steamed “pisser” clams on a dock in Nantucket. The small clams, steamed in white wine, served in a bucket under the summer sun with the swish of the Atlantic waves under the dock, screamed for chilled, somewhat fruity yet bone dry Pinot Grigio. With a crusty loaf to dunk in the juice it was the perfect summer lunch and Nantucket memory.
  • Barcelona is an amazing city filled with the fantastical art of Gaudi and museums devoted to Picasso and Miro, but there is also art at the La Boqueria market where the variety of foods and tastes is almost overwhelming. IMG_4776So pull up a stool, order a bottle of wine from the Priorate and start noshing. The wine of Priorate is primarily Grenache and there is nothing like ordering up an array of tapas amid the bustle of the market, especially with a bowl of squid and beans as part of the choice, and sharing the bottle with good friends. It is a highlight memory of what Barcelona is all about… art, food and life.
  • Then there is my favorite bottle of Chianti, which we sipped with grilled-to- perfection sliced Chianina beef in a little trattoria called La Grotta della Rana (the courtyard is pictured above) in the small village of San Sano in Tuscany. The San Felice Il Grigio Chianti Classico Riserva is not the most famous or priciest of the area, but it was perfect – the vineyard is just a few kilometers away in the rolling countryside near Giaole. It’s pairing food and wine from the place – the easiest pairing rule you can remember for sure! And doesn’t the wine always seem to taste better when you’re in the special place of its origin? Sure does for me.
  • We’ll always have Paris – and the memory of dining at Alain Ducasse. The tasting menu was outrageously enjoyable as were our dinner companions, Parisian friends who know their way around a wine list!  This was one of the best splurges ever, complete with a bottle of the famed Chateau Haut Brion. Haut Brion is one of the 1st Growth Bordeaux estates and the wines are exceptional (both in taste and price!). Typically a blend of Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot the wine is an amazing experience, with layers of tastes that punctuate it as a memorable sipping experience. This night was the epitome of French fine dining. I saved the bottle.

I could go on and on – but will spare you! The amazing thing about wine is that its experience can last well beyond the empty glass or bottle.  And sometimes those most amazing experiences are right at home too. For Cris’ last birthday we grilled a steak, sat on the deck and opened a bottle of 1994 Silver Oak Napa Cabernet Sauvignon.  We not only celebrated her birthday but were reminded of trips to Napa and Sonoma and all of the magical moments that wine has brought to life for us.

And that’s what Sips, and wine memories, are all about.

New Zealand’s Big Reds

We’re back!  It was a terrific visit to New Zealand. What a beautiful and diverse country – from the verdant hillsides covered in vines to the rugged natural beauty of the South Island, from the bustle of wharf-side Aukland to the laid back charm of Queenstown this is a nation of experiences.  And that certainly includes the full range of wine experiences.

In January I wrote some resolutions so let’s make good on another one: “March – as we look forward to spring in the northern hemisphere, they are picking grapes in New Zealand so I think we’ll try some of the Cabernet and Merlot from the North Island.” And let’s add Syrah to that too. Other red varietals as well as Chardonnay and Pinot Gris are grown on the North Island but we’ll stick to the three biggies.

When you think red from New Zealand, think Hawke’s Bay first, then Aukland. These are warm weather places and the regions that produce the most Cab, Merlot, Syrah and Bordeaux varieties and from which we have the best chance of finding some on our shelves.  Hawke’s Bay is also an area that has a subregion with a unique soil type called “Gimblett Gravel.” IMG_2043I had several of these on the trip and I think it brings something different to the taste of the wines – there is a flinty dry mineralty which adds to the character. It’s similar to the Napa Valley Cabs from Rutherford with the well known “Rutherford Dust” of the gravelly soil there.

For the most part the wines I had were big and boldly flavored; ripe, warm weather offerings made to drink today. And, of course, capped with a screw top. Some of the Syrah were like a smack in the face they were so powerful and peppery – more like the inky black Petit Syrah grape. I admit, it took a bit getting used to and to me they definitely needed food at the same time. The best matches I had with the Syrah were a braised short rib one night and a coffee rubbed steak another. Big flavors to match up with big flavors. Not wine for the faint-hearted!

My favorite sips were the Cab/Merlot and Bordeaux style blends. These were good food wines to have with the New Zealand lamb, venison and beef – versatile and drinkable. The Hawke’s Bay wines are clearly “New World” with bursting forward fruitiness and heady flavors of currant, blueberry and brambles. They aren’t tight or tannic making them an easy choice right off of the shelf. One of the wines I had was from Waiheke Island near Aukland which is rich in volcanic soils and it was one of the biggest mouthfuls of Bordeaux styled wine I’ve ever had.

So the bottom line is that we discovered some new sips that add to the big wide world of tasting experiences.  I just love keeping my New Year Resolutions!

Unfortunately for us there are not a lot of these New Zealand wines in US distribution at retail but here are some to try that I have seen, including my favorite, Te Mata “Awatea.” Be sure to give a look to the wine list when you head to your favorite steakhouse too.

Let’s Sip!

Every Day Sip
2014 Villa Maria Cabernet Merlot, Hawke’s Bay, Cellar Selection $18
Good everyday example of a Hawke’s Bay red blend and since Villa Maria is a pretty big exporter of Sauvignon Blanc there are a number of retailers who also carry this. Definitely worth a try if you see it.

2011 Craggy Range Te Kahu $20
From the Wine Advocate: ”A blend of 69% Merlot, 9% Cabernet Franc, 13% Cabernet Sauvignon and 9% Malbec, the deep garnet-purple-colored 2011 Gimblett Gravels Te Kahu has a nose of warm plums, crushed black currants and wild blueberries with nuances of cedar, toast, cloves and dried mint. Light to medium-bodied with a slightly hollow mid-palate, it nonetheless gives very drinkable, delicate, black fruit and spice flavors in the mouth supported by crisp acid and chewy tannins. It finishes medium to long.”

Guest Sip
2010 Craggy Range Syrah Gimblett Gravels Vineyard $30IMG_2228
A chewy Syrah with bold flavor and lots of peppery spiciness.

2014 Te Mata “Awatea” Bordeaux Blend Hawkes Bay $30
My favorite of all the ones tasted from Hawke’s Bay during our trip! A blend of 45% Cabernet Sauvignon, 33% Merlot, 14% Cabernet Franc and 8% Petit Verdot. Full flavored and as good as any Napa or Sonoma Cab Blend and equal to even pricier wines from Bordeaux. I think it’s right between both with the approachability of California and the nuance of France.

Splurge Sip
2013 Vidal “El Legado” Syrah Hawke’s Bay $65
Every critic agrees on this one – just a terrific wine with lush dark fruit and complexity.

Chile’s Carmenere

Have you already forgotten your New Year Resolutions?  Well I haven’t!  My first “Resolution Wine” of the the new year is Carmenere from Chile.  If you haven’t had any yet then it’s certainly time to try some now.

Carmenere is quickly becoming Chile’s Malbec.  By that I mean that as Malbec has come to define Argentina, so too will Carmenere come to define Chile.  The reason is simple – in addition to the terrific Cabernet Sauvignon we get from Chile, Carmenere holds a more unique place in the world of wine.

In France, it’s native land, it never achieved the greatness of a standalone varietal.  It was virtually always just used as part of blending in Bordeaux.  Not so in Chile.  Carmenere found its way there in the 1800’s with other French varietals and it began to thrive.  However it was often mistaken for a local “Merlot” – until some testing in the mid 1990’s nobody really knew what it was.  And the Chilean “Merlot” that was rather unusual finally found its place.

Chile is now the only place in the world that is widely growing Carmenere – and making wines that have dramatically become a uniquely Chilean entry into the world wine scene.  What can you expect?  In an earlier post I wrote “it’s got a dark and fruity flavor with an almost smokey character that to me is like a rustic version of Merlot.”  Hey, I stand by that!  But let’s get a little deeper.

It’s a deep ruby red that seems to glow in the glass. When I sip a Carmenere I usually find a dense black cherry flavor with hints of spice and just a touch of mocha.  It’s that spice that makes it more rustic and, to me, unique to the grape.  In some of the wines it’s a definite peppery quality; in others more like cloves or allspice.  But, guess what – there’s no need to get all caught up in any of these subtleties if you just want a juicy, tasty, accessible, everyday glass of red in your hand.  And that’s the particular reason I am coming to love Carmenere.  It’s got really good acidity but isn’t very tannic meaning this is a wine that is great all by itself to sip and perfect with a burger or just about any thing off the grill.  It’s also a wine to reach for with some more challenging dishes like Mexican food.

And the best part is that it is really – and I mean really – affordable. Most of the Carmenere you’ll find on the shelves is well under $20.  How good is that! There is also highly regarded, costly bottles too – but let’s walk before we run.

Here are some to try that are pretty widely available.  If you don’t see any at your wine store just ask them to get some for you – you’ll be doing both of you a favor.  Let’s sip!

Every Days Sips
2014 Root 1 Carmenere $10

2015 Concha y Toro Casillero del Diablo Carmenere $10

2013 Chono Carmenere Single Vineyard $12

2014 Casas del Bosque Reserva Carmenere $14

2011 Montes Alpha Carmenere $20

2014 Concha y Toro Marques de Casa Concha Carmenere $20

NOTE: I you want to learn a lot more about the wines of Chile you can visit the official site here.

Twelve Wines for Holiday Times

‘Twas the night before Christmas and all through the house not a creature was stirring… except me – the wine cellar mouse! Yes it’s that time of year and I thought I’d share some thoughts for a Christmas case of wine with some rhyme. So here is my own version of the twelve days of Christmas!

Try one from the Left Bank meant to rest and to age (1)
and one from the West with notes of berry and sage (2).

Then pick a wine from new lands (3)
and one from the boot of old (4);
While making another choice from the hands of Oz (5)
and a bright green bottle from out of the cold (6).

Now you need some sparkle that glints, shines and dances in the light (7)
and a glass filled with ruby red to savor late into the night (8).

No holiday is complete unless there is fame (9) and a jaunty sipper to enjoy with the game (10).
And we’ll end with a bottle of artful delight (11) and one to celebrate the gift of this night (12).

This is a case for all to enjoy any day of the year
but especially now at this time of friends and good cheer!

Merry Christmas to all and Happy Hanukkah too – these are my sips of best wishes for you!
And if you’re still following here are some wines to fill your wishes too.

1 – 2010 Chateau d’Issan Margaux $80 “A complete, medium to full-bodied, exquisite Margaux from this medieval, moat-encircled, compellingly beautiful estate in the southern Medoc, D’Issan’s 2010 is a blend of 60% Cabernet Sauvignon and 40% Merlot – a dense, purple-colored wine with beautiful aromatics of spring flowers, blueberries and black raspberries as well as hints of cassis, tar and charcoal. The wine is gorgeously pure, well-balanced, and soft enough to be approached in 4-5 years or cellared for 25-30.” -Robert Parker Reviewed by: The Wine Advocate – 95 pts

2 – 2012 Chateau Ste Michelle Cabernet Sauvignon Canoe Ridge $28 “This wine is aromatically reserved with notes of milk chocolate, char, berry, barrel spices and high-toned herbs. It’s silky and polished in feel, with richness and elegance to the coffee flavors.” – Sean Sullivan, 11/1/2015  Reviewed by: The Wine Enthusiast – 90 pts

3 – 2012 Norton Malbec Reserva $16 “Offers a fruity aroma, with red and dark fruit flavors that are complex and woven together with fine tannins. Minerally midpalate, presenting some inviting peppery notes. Finishes with a flush of spice and brambly details. Drink now through 2018.” – Kim Marcus, Dec 31, 2014 Reviewed by: Wine Spectator – 90 pts

4 – 2012 San Felice Chianti Classico Riserva il Grigio $22 “A cool, sleek style of Il Grigio with mint, lavender and black-cherry aromas and flavors. Sweet tobacco as well. Full body with firm, fine tannins and a long, fresh finish. A wine with lovely texture and tension. Drink now.” – October 29th, 2015 Reviewed by: James Suckling – 92 pts

5 – 2014 Two Hands Shiraz Angel’s Share $30 “While there are no half measures with the weight or shape of this wine, it has a touch of elegance running alongside its blackberry, blood plum and dark chocolate fruit; the tannins wait until the last moment to join forces with the oak to speak clearly of the long future ahead. Great value.” -James Halliday – 94 pts

6 – 2012 J J Prum Graacher Himmelreich Riesling Kabinett $28 “Prum wines are among the most exciting and delicious Rieslings of the middle Mosel. Slow-to-develop and long-lived, these wines are full of pure stone fruits with a slate-mineral driven finish.”

7 – 2012 Schramsberg Blanc de Noirs $35 “The 2012 Blanc de Noirs expresses generous aromas of yellow peach, fresh orange zest, cantaloupe, and citrus blossom, which gradually layers with fragrances of warm apple dumpling and creme anglaise. Lush flavors coat the palate with tangerine, Santa Rosa plum, candied ginger and a hint of French flan. This sparkling wine delivers a clean, lingering finish with crisp mouthwatering.”

8 – 2009 Graham’s Late Bottled Vintage Port $24 “This is a smooth and rich wine, with generous fruit alongside spice and ripe, black plum fruit accents. Ready to drink, it shows surprising balance between a perfumed character and an unctuous palate.” – Roger Voss, 8/1/2015  Reviewed by: The Wine Enthusiast – 90 pts

9 – 2012 Opus One $235 “Glorious purity of fruit here with black currants, blueberries, dark chocolate, fresh herbs and forest floor. Hints of mint too, plus hazelnut and chocolate. Full body with seamless tannins and balance. Tight and compacted tannins with beautiful fruit and great length. Goes on for minutes. One of the best Opus’ in years. Hard not to drink now but better in 2018. October 2015 release. This is 79% cabernet sauvignon, 7% cabernet franc, 6% merlot, 6% petit verdot and 2% malbec.” – July 28th, 2015  Reviewed by: James Suckling – 97 pts

10 – 2013 Klinker Brick Zinfandel Old Vine $16 “2013 Old Vine Zinfandel is a blend of 16 different vineyard blocks of old vine zinfandel vineyards with an average age of 85 years. With berries and spice on the nose, dark, sweet fruit fills the palate with just a hint of black pepper. This wine has a long, lingering finish.”

11 – 2012 Hess Collection Cabernet Sauvignon $50 “With 20% Malbec, this wine is layered in refined complexity, swaying from juicy blueberry to herbaceous cherry and currant. Restrained in oak, with the slightest notion of vanilla on the palate, it finishes in mouthwatering dark chocolate, the tannins firm and structured.” – Virginie Boone, 9/1/2015  Reviewed by: The Wine Enthusiast – 93 pts

12 – 2014 St. Rose Pinot Noir Nunes Vineyard 777 $48 “Perfumed aromatics of youthful cherry and dusty tannins mingle with traces of lavender and white  floral notes. A bright entry offers a blend of red fruit— raspberry, cranberry, dark cherry and rhubarb—that is integrated with softening tannins and hints of oak. A ripe blackberry and vanilla essence appears near the  finish, adding another dimension as the  flavors linger on the palate.

Knowing Bordeaux Part 2 – The Medoc

St. Estephe, Pauillac, St. Julien and Margaux.  These are perhaps the four most famous of the Bordeaux appellations and they all share two common characteristics – they only produce red wines and they are all located in the Haut Medoc on the left bank of the Gironde River.map-vignoble-de-bordeaux-medoc

While there are certainly great wines produced in other areas of Bordeaux, one could argue that it is these four that are most indicative of how we think about the region.  Each are part of the original 1855 Classification. Instigated by Napoleon III, the 1855 Classification was meant as a quality ranking based on reputation and price for the wines being produced in the Gironde.  Four of the five Premier Crus or First Growth estates came from the Medoc (the exception being Chateau Haut Brion from Graves, which is to the south of the village of Bordeaux).  These First Growths are the signature wines of France and some of the most sought after and long-lived wines in the world.  Odds are you will recognize them even if you haven’t had the wonderful opportunity to sip them!  Here they are :

  • Chateau Lafite Rothschild of Pauillac
  • Chateau Mouton Rothschild of Pauillac
  • Chateau Latour of Pauillac
  • Chateau Margaux of Margaux
  • Chateau Haut-Brion of Graves

There are many incredible wines made in this region. In order to capture all the quality wines of the Medoc a new classification was introduced in 1932 to recognize them – Cru Bourgeois. There are approximately 240 of these estates designated annually.  So what we have is a system for understanding all of the wines coming out of this area relative to each other and many of them are affordable and drinkable every day wines.  See my post on Burgers and Bordeaux for some tasty examples.

To me the main thing to know and remember about the Medoc is that it is the definitive use and style Cabernet Sauvignon based and blended wines to which the world aspired.  This region is responsible for the intensity of focus that California winemakers put on Cabernet.  To be taken seriously on the world wine stage they had to compete with the Medoc.  And compete successfully they did, creating a fruit forward bolder style that captured the taste preferences of the world – but that’s for another post.  The fact is that the Medoc set the standard.

The wines for his area use the “noble grapes” of Bordeaux.  Rarely is there a single varietal wine, rather the wines are blends made from at least two of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot. They are often wines that need a bit of age in the bottle to round out the tannins and let the flavors come together.  If you are a California Cab drinker then you will likely find them a bit leaner and tannic when younger, but let me tell you, these are great food wines.

I find their attention to terroir and devotion to blending to be their artistry.  So seek out some of the wines of the Medoc and sip the essence of French wines.

Everyday Sips

2012 Chateau Greysac Medoc Cru Bourgeois  $20
2012 Larose Trintaudon Haut Medoc $20
2012 Blason d’Issan Margaux $25

Guest Sips
2012 Chateau d’Armailhac Pauillac $50
2012 La Dame de Montrose Saint Estephe $35
2012 Chateau Talbot Saint Julien $55

Splurge Sips
2012 Chateau Rauzan Segla Margaux $70
2013 Chateau Pontet Canet Pauillac $100
2000 Chateau Latour Pauillac $1,000 – if you have one of these call me!!!

Knowing Bordeaux – Part 1

Bordeaux.  If there is one word in wine that captures the culture and costliness, savior faire and snobbery, history and histrionics of wine this is it.  There are other parts of the world where wine has been made more anciently but none where wine has come to so be exquisitely defined.  Bordeaux truly has been the ‘pebble in the pond’ from which wine popularity and appreciation have spread outward (largely thanks to the British – but that’s another story).  Yet to many who like to drink and enjoy wine it remains somewhat confusing and inaccessible.  Let’s change that by starting with a little journey through the region.

Reds are the dominant wines in Bordeaux with Cabernet Sauvignon getting most of the attention, but Merlot is actually more widely planted. The red wines are blends of the ‘noble grapes’ of Bordeaux – Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot.  Usually two or more of these grapes are in the bottle but you won’t see them listed on the label.  The white wines are Sauvignon Blanc blended with Semillon.  The French don’t label by the grape type so this is why it’s good to know a bit about the region in general and each of the particular areas within it.  You can then know what to look for in the store and how to buy smarter.

Knowing Bordeaux begins with some basic geography.  The geography of Bordeaux directly influences the wine in the bottle.  Bordeaux is located near the Atlantic Ocean in the southwestern corner of France.  The ocean plays a very strong role in the wine of the region because of the cool and chilly dampness and rain that is typical during the growing season.  However, the vines get some moderating protection from a coastal forest so the extremes are not as significant as in other maritime growing environments.

The region is bisected by two major rivers which then join into a large estuary.  The Garonne River meets the Dordogne River near the city of Bordeaux and together they make up the Gironde – the estuary that runs into the Atlantic.  These four bodies of water – ocean and three rivers – are the natural demarcation of the Bordeaux wine country, controlling climate and creating the terroir of the region.  The gravelly soils are ideal for Cabernet and the more fertile areas help Merlot thrive.

The eastern side of the Dordogne and Gironde is known as the “Right Bank.”  It’s here that Merlot based wines are predominant. At the center is the village of St. Emilion and scattered though the broader area are Pomerol, Fronsac and others.  This is the Libournais, so named after the city of Libourne.

fotoBORDELAIS-mapa-post-sobre-cata-Bordeaux-1140x904

To the west of the Garonne and Gironde is the “Left Bank.”  This is home to the most famous wines of Bordeaux from the chateaux of the Medoc north of the town of Bordeaux – St. Estephe, Pauillac, St. Julien, Margaux – and Graves to the south.  The Left Bank wines are driven by Cabernet Sauvignon, which needs to be hardy in that maritime climate and makes wine that is tannic, structured and very age-worthy.  In Graves it is also where the white wines of Bordeaux are prominent. Then tucked away near the banks of the Garonne is Sauternes and the world famous dessert wine of Chateau D’Yquem.

Between the rivers is a fertile triangle of land known as Entre-Deux-Mers, literally ‘between the waters.’  This is the breadbasket of Bordeaux wine where there is big production and a high volume of every day drinking Merlot based wines.  There aren’t a lot of Entre-Deux-Mers wines on our shelves, but they are a staple throughout France.

In future posts I’ll get into more detail on both the Right and Left Bank and the styles and characters of the wines we’ll find there, but here’s a little sampling to wet your tastebuds!

Every Day Sip
2012 Chateau Cap de Faugeres Castillon Cotes de Bordeaux $18

2012 Francois Thienpont Rouge Lalande de Pomerol $18

2012 Chateau Bellevue Peycharneau Bordeaux Superieur $14

Guest Sip
2012 Chateau d’Armailhac Pauillac $50

2012 Chateau Sansonnet Saint Emilion $36

2012 Chateau Cantenac Brown Margaux $48

Splurge Sip
2012 Chateau Pape Clement Pessac Leognan $100

1999 d’Yquem $100 (auction price) for half bottle 375ml