Discovering the Wines of Spain

Spain is a big country… especially when it comes to wine. It’s actually the third largest wine producer in the world. And it’s got an ancient and vibrant winemaking culture. In an earlier post we delved into the Spanish Reds, which are led by the noble grape Tempranillo. I suggest you pay the post a visit to get the big picture about these luscious Spanish Reds. This time let’s go further afield and sip into more of the wines of Spain. And even though we’ve written about Tempranillo there’s more to add.

Let’s play a game. It’s kind of like a word association. Since many folks don’t know a lot about Spanish wines, one way to get the hang of them is to relate them to more familiar varieties. So I will toss out some of the more common varieties of wine and then line up what offering from Spain might give you a similar experience.  Let’s fill in the blanks!

If you like ______________________,

then you might like this wine from Spain________________________

If you like… Then you might want to try…
Sauvignon Blanc Albarino. Albarino is dry and fragrant, fruity and crisply acidic. It comes primarily from the northwest of Spain near the Atlantic, an area called Rias Baixas (rees bye shush). When you sip Albarino you’ll likely find a crisp apple-like taste along with a squeeze of lime, although some remind me more of a Bosch pear. It is one of my favorite easy to drink, highly affordable and tasty Sips that is particularly good with seafoods.Think of the classic Sauvignon Blanc tastiness with New Zealand green lipped mussels but pop an Albarino instead and you’ll get the picture.
Pinot Grigio/Pinot Gris Verdejo. Verdejo is from the Rueda region of Spain within the Duero Valley. This is a light white with reminders of pear and lemony citrus flavors. It’s a lovely sipping wine and always one of my favorite summer picks, but it’s also a nice choice when you just want a glass of white while puttering in the kitchen.
Rose’ Rosado. The Rosados of Spain are much like many of the Rose’ from the US.  They’re a deeper red rose color with boney dryness rather than the pale, salmon colored rose’ of Provence. A bit richer in fruit flavor too with Garnacha and Tempranillo as the primary grapes.
Pinot Noir Rioja Crianza. The young Tempranillo from Rioja remind me of Pinot’s from California with forward fruit, a hint of earth, ripe berry favors and easy drinkability. I love their versatility with a wide range of foods – from grilled salmon to roasted chicken, pork chops to fettuccini with mushrooms.
Cabernet Sauvignon from the US or South America Ribera del Duero and Rioja Reserva Tempranillo. Great expressions of the grape and aged enough to soften the wine for ready drinking. Lush flavors of plum or licorice, dark fruit and currant. Grill some lamb chops and pop the cork!
Bordeaux and Merlot Toro Tempranillo. The wines of Toro have a bit of an edge. Bold just like the name. A bit more rustic and they remind me of the Merlot driven Bordeaux from the Right Bank. (Read about them here). Sip the plump black fruit and plum, graphite and cedar.

And there you have it. Discovering new Sips is one of my favorite things and one of the best ways to do that is to relate what you like to new experiences. So here’s your homework assignment – get out there and Sip some wines from Spain!

And here’s a some help to get you started.

Every Day Sips
2016 Burgans Albarino $15
2015 Martin Codax Albarino $14
2015 Nisia Old Vines Verdejo $14
2014 Shaya Rueda Verdejo Old Vines $13
2016 Cune Rosado $13
2016 Bodegas Muga Rioja Rosado $15
2012 Bodegas Hermanos Pecina Crianza $20
2012 Marques de Caceres Crianza $13
2014 Romanico Toro $15
2012 Hacienda Lopez de Haro Reserva $18

Guest Sips
2011 Marques de Murrieta Reserva Rioja $23
2010 Vinas del Cenit Cenit $50
2012 Pesquera Reserva $50

Full Bodied Red Wine

Body is one of the most common descriptors of wine – and I think most of us know instinctively what it means.  It’s easy to identify with.  Some wines are thin.  Some are rich and full.  Others can be described as ‘muscular’ or ‘flabby.’  Sounds like people doesn’t it?

Body is really about how the wine feels in your mouth and much of that has to so with how much alcohol the wine has and the grape variety as well as the wine making style.  For a lot of wine drinkers, full bodied wines are the wine of choice.  After all, they tend to pack the most punch per sip.  We love the roundness of the flavor and heft of the wine.  Americans have never been accused of embracing delay of gratification in anything, have we?  I also think that we have learned to seek out these taste experiences in the US since we gravitate to bigger flavor foods.  How many of us were raised on a meat and potatoes diet? Lots of dairy.  Burgers?  Not a lot of nuance there.

And then there is the “New World” style of winemaking and the very popular rating scales used in the media.  The New World style, of which California’s influence is the most notable, is fruit forward, mostly drink-it-now, driven by the grape variety and the winemaking.  More extraction and higher alcohol are common.  A highly respected and followed publication, Robert Parker’s The Wine Advocate, became known for higher ratings of big and powerful wines. Higher ratings mean higher prices and greater sales – and more wineries jumped on the upfront style. So it’s no wonder that fuller bodied wines seem to dominate what we drink most.

What are these wines?  Most are red, but there are a couple of whites (particularly Chardonnay and Viognier, although we’re talking red today). If you like it full and bold here’s what to look for, with one caveat – one size does not fit all.  Each of the following cover the spectrum of weight and body.  Consider these a place to start.

Cabernet Sauvignon: In my post, “A Taste of Cabernet” I wrote, “Cabernet is a conundrum – big, bold and powerful as well as elegant, refined and beautiful.”  Cabernet has it all – structure, weight and depth to go along with its finesse and age-worthiness.  It fills your mouth with bursts of dark fruit and plum, tobacco and leather, cedar and mint – all kinds of layered flavors.  California, Chile and Australia lead with the fuller bodied styles dominated by fruit and drinkability. Bordeaux wines can also be considered full bodied for sure, but to me where they fall is much more dependent on the specific area of Bordeaux and the nature of the blend in the bottle.

Syrah/Shiraz:  Syrah from the Northern Rhone – Cote Rotie (the “Roasted Slope”), Hermitage and St. Joseph, and the Aussie Shiraz are midnight dark and intense with blackberry, currant and smoke. The tannins are softer than Cab.  I love Syrah/Shiraz with lamb and beef.  More Syrah is coming out of California too.

Petite Sirah: Not the same as the above, it’s its own grape and it is a chewer!  It’s on the shelves on it’s own from California and is frequently blended into Zinfandel to add punch to that wine. Inky black and bold.

Zinfandel:  Much Zin is really more medium bodied, but there are bolder styles driven by the blacker fruits, as opposed to red, and higher alcohol, as well as those with some Petite Sirah in the blend.  The “old vine” estate and single vineyard Zins are typically fuller bodied.

Merlot: Yes, Merlot is usually fuller bodied.  But it tends to get overlooked by its softness, its less tannic structure.  To appreciate Merlot’s full bodied appeal have a cheddar cheeseburger.

Malbec: Malbec has come into its own in Argentina.  It’s softer than Cab and to me has more of an edge to it than Merlot.  It’s affordable and approachable – a good choice to have on hand at home as your go-to glass of red.

To get into all the potential full bodied reds and the iterations of blends and indigenous grape varieties would turn this post into a tome!  One thing to take away – if the wine is 14.5% alcohol or higher you can be pretty sure that it will be a full bodied sip.

But know that the truth is in what YOU taste, and in what you expect out of the wine and the time you’re enjoying it.  I don’t like rules about wine.  I like guides that leave up to me to decide what I like or don’t like.  And the fun is in exploring it all.

Not a bad way to sip.

Many Napa Valleys

When it comes to defining wine in the US most people probably sort right away to Napa Valley.  It was the wines of Napa that really put the US on the world wine map, and Napa seems to serve as the shorthand for our wine in general, California wine more specifically, and all of the images and texture that conjure up “wine country.” And that’s all good for sure.  But there’s a lot more to Napa than those generalities capture.  In fact there are many Napa Valleys. No, not geographically, but within the confines of this amazingly special county there are clusters of growing regions that truly give it more meaning and definition when it comes to the wine.

These are called AVAs – American Viticultural Areas, and within the Napa Valley, which is an appellation all on its own,  there are sixteen sub-regions.  Each exists because there are some shared characteristics of earth and sky, a confluence of soil and climate that lend distinctiveness to the grapes and wines.  When it comes to getting deeper into the bottle and appreciating the magic of wine, the more you know about where and how its grown, and how its made, the more each Sip becomes more than just a taste.  So when you see an AVA on the label it’s your first clue about what’s in the bottle.

Here are the 16 Napa Valley AVAs along with a map from the Napa Valley Vintners.  And if you visit their site here there’s even more detail.  But I’d like hit a few of the highlights from my own, nontechnical perspective.

  • Atlas PeakNapaValley AVA Map
  • Calistoga
  • Chiles Valley
  • Coomsbville
  • Diamond Mountain
  • Howell Mountain
  • Los Carneros
  • Mount Veeder
  • Oak Knoll
  • Oakville
  • Rutherford
  • Spring Mountain
  • St. Helena
  • Stags Leap
  • Wild Horse Valley
  • Yountville

I don’t pick favorites (insert the smiley face emoji here!) – but I love

  • The Cabernets from Oakville, Rutherford and Stags Leap. To me these valley floor growing areas are what Napa Cab is all about – ripe and lush, structured and textured with layers of taste and tannin to drink now or park for a while.
  • That Los Carneros is unique and is a shared AVA with Sonoma – and its an area that greets us with the cooler and windy influences of San Pablo Bay, which means Pinot Noir with bright berry fruitiness and tingly acidity and Chardonnays that seem to mimic the mineralty of Chablis
  • The grapes from the mountain ridges where they grow above the fog line, ripening in the sunshine to robust flavors. From Spring Mountain to Mt. Veeder, Howell Mountain to Diamond Mountain the Cabs are powerful and the Merlot are lip-smackers.
  • That the northern part of the valley up by Calistoga and St. Helena is the warmest. I like it for the big tastes of Zin and Syrah and for Cabs that are densely fruity. We paid a visit to Calistoga in an earlier post you can check out.  This is also where I get my favorite Cabernet Franc direct from the winery.

Napa Valley is many wines and many Sips and no single post can possibly capture them all.  But as you dive in a little deeper and choose some wines from the different AVAs you’ll find the diversity and nuance, as well as the variety and vitality, that make the many Napas the quintessential wine country.

Here are some Sips for you to explore – as well as some tips on paying a visit to Napa Valley.

Every Day Sip
2015 Frog’s Leap Rutherford Sauvignon Blanc $12
Cameron Hughes Lot Cabernet Sauvignon Rutherford $20
Martin Ray Chardonnay Los Carneros $20

Guest Sip
BV Rutherford Cabernet $28
Steltzner Cabernet Stags Leap District $35
Cuvaison Pinot Noir Carneros $35
Mondavi Oakville Cabernet $40
Ballentine 2014 Cabernet Franc Pocai Vineyard Calistoga $48
Terra Valentine Cabernet Spring Mountain $48
Von Strasser Cabernet Diamond Mountain, 2012 $50

Splurge Sip
Groth Cabernet Oakville $55
Chimney Rock Cabernet Stags Leap $70
2012 Staglin Cabernet Sauvignon Rutherford $180

New Zealand’s Big Reds

We’re back!  It was a terrific visit to New Zealand. What a beautiful and diverse country – from the verdant hillsides covered in vines to the rugged natural beauty of the South Island, from the bustle of wharf-side Aukland to the laid back charm of Queenstown this is a nation of experiences.  And that certainly includes the full range of wine experiences.

In January I wrote some resolutions so let’s make good on another one: “March – as we look forward to spring in the northern hemisphere, they are picking grapes in New Zealand so I think we’ll try some of the Cabernet and Merlot from the North Island.” And let’s add Syrah to that too. Other red varietals as well as Chardonnay and Pinot Gris are grown on the North Island but we’ll stick to the three biggies.

When you think red from New Zealand, think Hawke’s Bay first, then Aukland. These are warm weather places and the regions that produce the most Cab, Merlot, Syrah and Bordeaux varieties and from which we have the best chance of finding some on our shelves.  Hawke’s Bay is also an area that has a subregion with a unique soil type called “Gimblett Gravel.” IMG_2043I had several of these on the trip and I think it brings something different to the taste of the wines – there is a flinty dry mineralty which adds to the character. It’s similar to the Napa Valley Cabs from Rutherford with the well known “Rutherford Dust” of the gravelly soil there.

For the most part the wines I had were big and boldly flavored; ripe, warm weather offerings made to drink today. And, of course, capped with a screw top. Some of the Syrah were like a smack in the face they were so powerful and peppery – more like the inky black Petit Syrah grape. I admit, it took a bit getting used to and to me they definitely needed food at the same time. The best matches I had with the Syrah were a braised short rib one night and a coffee rubbed steak another. Big flavors to match up with big flavors. Not wine for the faint-hearted!

My favorite sips were the Cab/Merlot and Bordeaux style blends. These were good food wines to have with the New Zealand lamb, venison and beef – versatile and drinkable. The Hawke’s Bay wines are clearly “New World” with bursting forward fruitiness and heady flavors of currant, blueberry and brambles. They aren’t tight or tannic making them an easy choice right off of the shelf. One of the wines I had was from Waiheke Island near Aukland which is rich in volcanic soils and it was one of the biggest mouthfuls of Bordeaux styled wine I’ve ever had.

So the bottom line is that we discovered some new sips that add to the big wide world of tasting experiences.  I just love keeping my New Year Resolutions!

Unfortunately for us there are not a lot of these New Zealand wines in US distribution at retail but here are some to try that I have seen, including my favorite, Te Mata “Awatea.” Be sure to give a look to the wine list when you head to your favorite steakhouse too.

Let’s Sip!

Every Day Sip
2014 Villa Maria Cabernet Merlot, Hawke’s Bay, Cellar Selection $18
Good everyday example of a Hawke’s Bay red blend and since Villa Maria is a pretty big exporter of Sauvignon Blanc there are a number of retailers who also carry this. Definitely worth a try if you see it.

2011 Craggy Range Te Kahu $20
From the Wine Advocate: ”A blend of 69% Merlot, 9% Cabernet Franc, 13% Cabernet Sauvignon and 9% Malbec, the deep garnet-purple-colored 2011 Gimblett Gravels Te Kahu has a nose of warm plums, crushed black currants and wild blueberries with nuances of cedar, toast, cloves and dried mint. Light to medium-bodied with a slightly hollow mid-palate, it nonetheless gives very drinkable, delicate, black fruit and spice flavors in the mouth supported by crisp acid and chewy tannins. It finishes medium to long.”

Guest Sip
2010 Craggy Range Syrah Gimblett Gravels Vineyard $30IMG_2228
A chewy Syrah with bold flavor and lots of peppery spiciness.

2014 Te Mata “Awatea” Bordeaux Blend Hawkes Bay $30
My favorite of all the ones tasted from Hawke’s Bay during our trip! A blend of 45% Cabernet Sauvignon, 33% Merlot, 14% Cabernet Franc and 8% Petit Verdot. Full flavored and as good as any Napa or Sonoma Cab Blend and equal to even pricier wines from Bordeaux. I think it’s right between both with the approachability of California and the nuance of France.

Splurge Sip
2013 Vidal “El Legado” Syrah Hawke’s Bay $65
Every critic agrees on this one – just a terrific wine with lush dark fruit and complexity.

Twelve Wines for Holiday Times

‘Twas the night before Christmas and all through the house not a creature was stirring… except me – the wine cellar mouse! Yes it’s that time of year and I thought I’d share some thoughts for a Christmas case of wine with some rhyme. So here is my own version of the twelve days of Christmas!

Try one from the Left Bank meant to rest and to age (1)
and one from the West with notes of berry and sage (2).

Then pick a wine from new lands (3)
and one from the boot of old (4);
While making another choice from the hands of Oz (5)
and a bright green bottle from out of the cold (6).

Now you need some sparkle that glints, shines and dances in the light (7)
and a glass filled with ruby red to savor late into the night (8).

No holiday is complete unless there is fame (9) and a jaunty sipper to enjoy with the game (10).
And we’ll end with a bottle of artful delight (11) and one to celebrate the gift of this night (12).

This is a case for all to enjoy any day of the year
but especially now at this time of friends and good cheer!

Merry Christmas to all and Happy Hanukkah too – these are my sips of best wishes for you!
And if you’re still following here are some wines to fill your wishes too.

1 – 2010 Chateau d’Issan Margaux $80 “A complete, medium to full-bodied, exquisite Margaux from this medieval, moat-encircled, compellingly beautiful estate in the southern Medoc, D’Issan’s 2010 is a blend of 60% Cabernet Sauvignon and 40% Merlot – a dense, purple-colored wine with beautiful aromatics of spring flowers, blueberries and black raspberries as well as hints of cassis, tar and charcoal. The wine is gorgeously pure, well-balanced, and soft enough to be approached in 4-5 years or cellared for 25-30.” -Robert Parker Reviewed by: The Wine Advocate – 95 pts

2 – 2012 Chateau Ste Michelle Cabernet Sauvignon Canoe Ridge $28 “This wine is aromatically reserved with notes of milk chocolate, char, berry, barrel spices and high-toned herbs. It’s silky and polished in feel, with richness and elegance to the coffee flavors.” – Sean Sullivan, 11/1/2015  Reviewed by: The Wine Enthusiast – 90 pts

3 – 2012 Norton Malbec Reserva $16 “Offers a fruity aroma, with red and dark fruit flavors that are complex and woven together with fine tannins. Minerally midpalate, presenting some inviting peppery notes. Finishes with a flush of spice and brambly details. Drink now through 2018.” – Kim Marcus, Dec 31, 2014 Reviewed by: Wine Spectator – 90 pts

4 – 2012 San Felice Chianti Classico Riserva il Grigio $22 “A cool, sleek style of Il Grigio with mint, lavender and black-cherry aromas and flavors. Sweet tobacco as well. Full body with firm, fine tannins and a long, fresh finish. A wine with lovely texture and tension. Drink now.” – October 29th, 2015 Reviewed by: James Suckling – 92 pts

5 – 2014 Two Hands Shiraz Angel’s Share $30 “While there are no half measures with the weight or shape of this wine, it has a touch of elegance running alongside its blackberry, blood plum and dark chocolate fruit; the tannins wait until the last moment to join forces with the oak to speak clearly of the long future ahead. Great value.” -James Halliday – 94 pts

6 – 2012 J J Prum Graacher Himmelreich Riesling Kabinett $28 “Prum wines are among the most exciting and delicious Rieslings of the middle Mosel. Slow-to-develop and long-lived, these wines are full of pure stone fruits with a slate-mineral driven finish.”

7 – 2012 Schramsberg Blanc de Noirs $35 “The 2012 Blanc de Noirs expresses generous aromas of yellow peach, fresh orange zest, cantaloupe, and citrus blossom, which gradually layers with fragrances of warm apple dumpling and creme anglaise. Lush flavors coat the palate with tangerine, Santa Rosa plum, candied ginger and a hint of French flan. This sparkling wine delivers a clean, lingering finish with crisp mouthwatering.”

8 – 2009 Graham’s Late Bottled Vintage Port $24 “This is a smooth and rich wine, with generous fruit alongside spice and ripe, black plum fruit accents. Ready to drink, it shows surprising balance between a perfumed character and an unctuous palate.” – Roger Voss, 8/1/2015  Reviewed by: The Wine Enthusiast – 90 pts

9 – 2012 Opus One $235 “Glorious purity of fruit here with black currants, blueberries, dark chocolate, fresh herbs and forest floor. Hints of mint too, plus hazelnut and chocolate. Full body with seamless tannins and balance. Tight and compacted tannins with beautiful fruit and great length. Goes on for minutes. One of the best Opus’ in years. Hard not to drink now but better in 2018. October 2015 release. This is 79% cabernet sauvignon, 7% cabernet franc, 6% merlot, 6% petit verdot and 2% malbec.” – July 28th, 2015  Reviewed by: James Suckling – 97 pts

10 – 2013 Klinker Brick Zinfandel Old Vine $16 “2013 Old Vine Zinfandel is a blend of 16 different vineyard blocks of old vine zinfandel vineyards with an average age of 85 years. With berries and spice on the nose, dark, sweet fruit fills the palate with just a hint of black pepper. This wine has a long, lingering finish.”

11 – 2012 Hess Collection Cabernet Sauvignon $50 “With 20% Malbec, this wine is layered in refined complexity, swaying from juicy blueberry to herbaceous cherry and currant. Restrained in oak, with the slightest notion of vanilla on the palate, it finishes in mouthwatering dark chocolate, the tannins firm and structured.” – Virginie Boone, 9/1/2015  Reviewed by: The Wine Enthusiast – 93 pts

12 – 2014 St. Rose Pinot Noir Nunes Vineyard 777 $48 “Perfumed aromatics of youthful cherry and dusty tannins mingle with traces of lavender and white  floral notes. A bright entry offers a blend of red fruit— raspberry, cranberry, dark cherry and rhubarb—that is integrated with softening tannins and hints of oak. A ripe blackberry and vanilla essence appears near the  finish, adding another dimension as the  flavors linger on the palate.

Knowing Bordeaux Part 2 – The Medoc

St. Estephe, Pauillac, St. Julien and Margaux.  These are perhaps the four most famous of the Bordeaux appellations and they all share two common characteristics – they only produce red wines and they are all located in the Haut Medoc on the left bank of the Gironde River.map-vignoble-de-bordeaux-medoc

While there are certainly great wines produced in other areas of Bordeaux, one could argue that it is these four that are most indicative of how we think about the region.  Each are part of the original 1855 Classification. Instigated by Napoleon III, the 1855 Classification was meant as a quality ranking based on reputation and price for the wines being produced in the Gironde.  Four of the five Premier Crus or First Growth estates came from the Medoc (the exception being Chateau Haut Brion from Graves, which is to the south of the village of Bordeaux).  These First Growths are the signature wines of France and some of the most sought after and long-lived wines in the world.  Odds are you will recognize them even if you haven’t had the wonderful opportunity to sip them!  Here they are :

  • Chateau Lafite Rothschild of Pauillac
  • Chateau Mouton Rothschild of Pauillac
  • Chateau Latour of Pauillac
  • Chateau Margaux of Margaux
  • Chateau Haut-Brion of Graves

There are many incredible wines made in this region. In order to capture all the quality wines of the Medoc a new classification was introduced in 1932 to recognize them – Cru Bourgeois. There are approximately 240 of these estates designated annually.  So what we have is a system for understanding all of the wines coming out of this area relative to each other and many of them are affordable and drinkable every day wines.  See my post on Burgers and Bordeaux for some tasty examples.

To me the main thing to know and remember about the Medoc is that it is the definitive use and style Cabernet Sauvignon based and blended wines to which the world aspired.  This region is responsible for the intensity of focus that California winemakers put on Cabernet.  To be taken seriously on the world wine stage they had to compete with the Medoc.  And compete successfully they did, creating a fruit forward bolder style that captured the taste preferences of the world – but that’s for another post.  The fact is that the Medoc set the standard.

The wines for his area use the “noble grapes” of Bordeaux.  Rarely is there a single varietal wine, rather the wines are blends made from at least two of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot. They are often wines that need a bit of age in the bottle to round out the tannins and let the flavors come together.  If you are a California Cab drinker then you will likely find them a bit leaner and tannic when younger, but let me tell you, these are great food wines.

I find their attention to terroir and devotion to blending to be their artistry.  So seek out some of the wines of the Medoc and sip the essence of French wines.

Everyday Sips

2012 Chateau Greysac Medoc Cru Bourgeois  $20
2012 Larose Trintaudon Haut Medoc $20
2012 Blason d’Issan Margaux $25

Guest Sips
2012 Chateau d’Armailhac Pauillac $50
2012 La Dame de Montrose Saint Estephe $35
2012 Chateau Talbot Saint Julien $55

Splurge Sips
2012 Chateau Rauzan Segla Margaux $70
2013 Chateau Pontet Canet Pauillac $100
2000 Chateau Latour Pauillac $1,000 – if you have one of these call me!!!

Fall In To Fuller Wines

It’s official… summer is over.  But in many parts of the country we get to enjoy a great time of year – Fall.  And it’s also time for me to get back to some posting!

In Fall the days are strikingly clear, the nights crisp and cool, and I love the crunchy rustle of the fallen leaves as you walk through them.  In the vineyard the vines begin to shut down too and the leaves turn reddish rust or golden – a beautiful time to visit.

But no matter where you live Fall seems to signal that it’s also time for heartier foods and a return to the bigger style wines that go with them.  If summer is a time for Zippy Whites then Fall brings me back to mouth-filling reds, so I find myself reaching for different ones that fit the season.  It can be the ideal tailgate wine – California Zin,  juicy Merlot from Washington, tasty Syrah/Grenache blends from the Rhone in France, lush Tempranillo from Spain, spicy Shiraz from Down-under or terrific everyday Malbec from Argentina.  And, of course, there is always Cabernet Sauvignon in all of it’s kingly splendor.

Sure, that’s a pretty big list, but the tastes of Fall bring a lot of variety into the mix. At our house we’ve already chopped the carrots and chunked the beef for hearty stew, baked chicken and Italian sausage in the oven, braised short ribs, made a pot of chili, grilled thick cut lamb chops, roasted the pork all day to pull for tacos al pastor and slow cooked Osso Buco – and it’s only early October!

If you follow Sips or remember The Wine Experience then you know that my personal food and wine pairing mantra is “drink what you like.”  Well I like putting many of the tastes of Fall foods together with reds that just seem to complete the package.  Here’s what I mean:

  • Chili and Zin. Zin adds a dash of peppery flavor and has the attitude to stand up to the multitude of ingredients, especially the tomato and peppers. Other choice: Primitivo.
  • Beef stew and Merlot. Merlot’s jammy flavor seems ideal for the supple gravy and soft beef chunks, as well as the sweetness of the carrots. Other choice: Cabernet.
  • Baked chicken and sausage with Rhones. The Grenache based blends of the southern Rhone bridge the mild flavored chicken and the spiced sausage.  This one is interesting because we actually use white wine in cooking but I like the way the red pulls it all together when it’s time to eat. Other choice Sangiovese.
  • Thick cut grilled lamb chops with Cabernet. The tannins of the Cab are like an exclamation point to the richness of the lamb. Other choice Tempranillo.
  • Braised short ribs with Shiraz. I love the fruit and spice with the meatiness. Other choice Merlot.
  • Osso Buco and Tempranillo. I like the acidity of the Tempranillo with the deep hearty flavor of the slow cooked veal shank. Other choice Nebbiolo.
  • Tacos and Malbec. Si.

I think it’s time to start cooking – then pick some wine from our Sips pages for Every Day, Guest and Splurge wine choices.  And as your special treat, here is the Chicken and Sausage recipe!

Cristina Pastina’s Chicken and Sausage
Serves 6
Note:  Your choice on the chicken.  You can use a whole chicken cut up or six split breast if you prefer just white meat.

Ingredients:
6 split chicken breasts (bone in)
4 Italian sausages, cut in thirds
6 medium sized Yukon gold potatoes, quartered
4 large carrots, peeled and cut to large chunks (3 or 4 per carrot)
1 large onion, halved and sliced
½ cup olive oil
1 cup dry white wine
½ cup seasoned bread crumbs
3 cloves garlic, minced
Kosher salt
Black pepper
1 tbs. oregano

Preparation:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees

  1. In a large baking dish, pour olive oil and coat the bottom.  Add the chicken and roll around to cover with oil.  Arrange chicken skin side up around the dish. You may use two baking dishes if more room is needed but this will add to the cooking time.
  2. Pour the wine over the chicken.
  3. Salt and pepper each breast.
  4. Sprinkle oregano, garlic and bread crumbs over each.
  5. Arrange sausage pieces, potatoes and carrots around the dish and between the chicken.
  6. Cover all with the onion slices.
  7. Loosely cover the dish with aluminum foil and bake in the oven for 1 hour.  Remove the foil and bake an additional 30 – 45 minutes to desired doneness – cooking time can vary… the tighter it’s packed the slower it cooks (don’t burn, but make sure the carrots and potatoes are cooked tender)  chicken should be browned by now…if not you may broil for a moment…but watch carefully.
  8. Serve.