Many Napa Valleys

When it comes to defining wine in the US most people probably sort right away to Napa Valley.  It was the wines of Napa that really put the US on the world wine map, and Napa seems to serve as the shorthand for our wine in general, California wine more specifically, and all of the images and texture that conjure up “wine country.” And that’s all good for sure.  But there’s a lot more to Napa than those generalities capture.  In fact there are many Napa Valleys. No, not geographically, but within the confines of this amazingly special county there are clusters of growing regions that truly give it more meaning and definition when it comes to the wine.

These are called AVAs – American Viticultural Areas, and within the Napa Valley, which is an appellation all on its own,  there are sixteen sub-regions.  Each exists because there are some shared characteristics of earth and sky, a confluence of soil and climate that lend distinctiveness to the grapes and wines.  When it comes to getting deeper into the bottle and appreciating the magic of wine, the more you know about where and how its grown, and how its made, the more each Sip becomes more than just a taste.  So when you see an AVA on the label it’s your first clue about what’s in the bottle.

Here are the 16 Napa Valley AVAs along with a map from the Napa Valley Vintners.  And if you visit their site here there’s even more detail.  But I’d like hit a few of the highlights from my own, nontechnical perspective.

  • Atlas PeakNapaValley AVA Map
  • Calistoga
  • Chiles Valley
  • Coomsbville
  • Diamond Mountain
  • Howell Mountain
  • Los Carneros
  • Mount Veeder
  • Oak Knoll
  • Oakville
  • Rutherford
  • Spring Mountain
  • St. Helena
  • Stags Leap
  • Wild Horse Valley
  • Yountville

I don’t pick favorites (insert the smiley face emoji here!) – but I love

  • The Cabernets from Oakville, Rutherford and Stags Leap. To me these valley floor growing areas are what Napa Cab is all about – ripe and lush, structured and textured with layers of taste and tannin to drink now or park for a while.
  • That Los Carneros is unique and is a shared AVA with Sonoma – and its an area that greets us with the cooler and windy influences of San Pablo Bay, which means Pinot Noir with bright berry fruitiness and tingly acidity and Chardonnays that seem to mimic the mineralty of Chablis
  • The grapes from the mountain ridges where they grow above the fog line, ripening in the sunshine to robust flavors. From Spring Mountain to Mt. Veeder, Howell Mountain to Diamond Mountain the Cabs are powerful and the Merlot are lip-smackers.
  • That the northern part of the valley up by Calistoga and St. Helena is the warmest. I like it for the big tastes of Zin and Syrah and for Cabs that are densely fruity. We paid a visit to Calistoga in an earlier post you can check out.  This is also where I get my favorite Cabernet Franc direct from the winery.

Napa Valley is many wines and many Sips and no single post can possibly capture them all.  But as you dive in a little deeper and choose some wines from the different AVAs you’ll find the diversity and nuance, as well as the variety and vitality, that make the many Napas the quintessential wine country.

Here are some Sips for you to explore – as well as some tips on paying a visit to Napa Valley.

Every Day Sip
2015 Frog’s Leap Rutherford Sauvignon Blanc $12
Cameron Hughes Lot Cabernet Sauvignon Rutherford $20
Martin Ray Chardonnay Los Carneros $20

Guest Sip
BV Rutherford Cabernet $28
Steltzner Cabernet Stags Leap District $35
Cuvaison Pinot Noir Carneros $35
Mondavi Oakville Cabernet $40
Ballentine 2014 Cabernet Franc Pocai Vineyard Calistoga $48
Terra Valentine Cabernet Spring Mountain $48
Von Strasser Cabernet Diamond Mountain, 2012 $50

Splurge Sip
Groth Cabernet Oakville $55
Chimney Rock Cabernet Stags Leap $70
2012 Staglin Cabernet Sauvignon Rutherford $180

New Zealand’s Big Reds

We’re back!  It was a terrific visit to New Zealand. What a beautiful and diverse country – from the verdant hillsides covered in vines to the rugged natural beauty of the South Island, from the bustle of wharf-side Aukland to the laid back charm of Queenstown this is a nation of experiences.  And that certainly includes the full range of wine experiences.

In January I wrote some resolutions so let’s make good on another one: “March – as we look forward to spring in the northern hemisphere, they are picking grapes in New Zealand so I think we’ll try some of the Cabernet and Merlot from the North Island.” And let’s add Syrah to that too. Other red varietals as well as Chardonnay and Pinot Gris are grown on the North Island but we’ll stick to the three biggies.

When you think red from New Zealand, think Hawke’s Bay first, then Aukland. These are warm weather places and the regions that produce the most Cab, Merlot, Syrah and Bordeaux varieties and from which we have the best chance of finding some on our shelves.  Hawke’s Bay is also an area that has a subregion with a unique soil type called “Gimblett Gravel.” IMG_2043I had several of these on the trip and I think it brings something different to the taste of the wines – there is a flinty dry mineralty which adds to the character. It’s similar to the Napa Valley Cabs from Rutherford with the well known “Rutherford Dust” of the gravelly soil there.

For the most part the wines I had were big and boldly flavored; ripe, warm weather offerings made to drink today. And, of course, capped with a screw top. Some of the Syrah were like a smack in the face they were so powerful and peppery – more like the inky black Petit Syrah grape. I admit, it took a bit getting used to and to me they definitely needed food at the same time. The best matches I had with the Syrah were a braised short rib one night and a coffee rubbed steak another. Big flavors to match up with big flavors. Not wine for the faint-hearted!

My favorite sips were the Cab/Merlot and Bordeaux style blends. These were good food wines to have with the New Zealand lamb, venison and beef – versatile and drinkable. The Hawke’s Bay wines are clearly “New World” with bursting forward fruitiness and heady flavors of currant, blueberry and brambles. They aren’t tight or tannic making them an easy choice right off of the shelf. One of the wines I had was from Waiheke Island near Aukland which is rich in volcanic soils and it was one of the biggest mouthfuls of Bordeaux styled wine I’ve ever had.

So the bottom line is that we discovered some new sips that add to the big wide world of tasting experiences.  I just love keeping my New Year Resolutions!

Unfortunately for us there are not a lot of these New Zealand wines in US distribution at retail but here are some to try that I have seen, including my favorite, Te Mata “Awatea.” Be sure to give a look to the wine list when you head to your favorite steakhouse too.

Let’s Sip!

Every Day Sip
2014 Villa Maria Cabernet Merlot, Hawke’s Bay, Cellar Selection $18
Good everyday example of a Hawke’s Bay red blend and since Villa Maria is a pretty big exporter of Sauvignon Blanc there are a number of retailers who also carry this. Definitely worth a try if you see it.

2011 Craggy Range Te Kahu $20
From the Wine Advocate: ”A blend of 69% Merlot, 9% Cabernet Franc, 13% Cabernet Sauvignon and 9% Malbec, the deep garnet-purple-colored 2011 Gimblett Gravels Te Kahu has a nose of warm plums, crushed black currants and wild blueberries with nuances of cedar, toast, cloves and dried mint. Light to medium-bodied with a slightly hollow mid-palate, it nonetheless gives very drinkable, delicate, black fruit and spice flavors in the mouth supported by crisp acid and chewy tannins. It finishes medium to long.”

Guest Sip
2010 Craggy Range Syrah Gimblett Gravels Vineyard $30IMG_2228
A chewy Syrah with bold flavor and lots of peppery spiciness.

2014 Te Mata “Awatea” Bordeaux Blend Hawkes Bay $30
My favorite of all the ones tasted from Hawke’s Bay during our trip! A blend of 45% Cabernet Sauvignon, 33% Merlot, 14% Cabernet Franc and 8% Petit Verdot. Full flavored and as good as any Napa or Sonoma Cab Blend and equal to even pricier wines from Bordeaux. I think it’s right between both with the approachability of California and the nuance of France.

Splurge Sip
2013 Vidal “El Legado” Syrah Hawke’s Bay $65
Every critic agrees on this one – just a terrific wine with lush dark fruit and complexity.

Fall In To Fuller Wines

It’s official… summer is over.  But in many parts of the country we get to enjoy a great time of year – Fall.  And it’s also time for me to get back to some posting!

In Fall the days are strikingly clear, the nights crisp and cool, and I love the crunchy rustle of the fallen leaves as you walk through them.  In the vineyard the vines begin to shut down too and the leaves turn reddish rust or golden – a beautiful time to visit.

But no matter where you live Fall seems to signal that it’s also time for heartier foods and a return to the bigger style wines that go with them.  If summer is a time for Zippy Whites then Fall brings me back to mouth-filling reds, so I find myself reaching for different ones that fit the season.  It can be the ideal tailgate wine – California Zin,  juicy Merlot from Washington, tasty Syrah/Grenache blends from the Rhone in France, lush Tempranillo from Spain, spicy Shiraz from Down-under or terrific everyday Malbec from Argentina.  And, of course, there is always Cabernet Sauvignon in all of it’s kingly splendor.

Sure, that’s a pretty big list, but the tastes of Fall bring a lot of variety into the mix. At our house we’ve already chopped the carrots and chunked the beef for hearty stew, baked chicken and Italian sausage in the oven, braised short ribs, made a pot of chili, grilled thick cut lamb chops, roasted the pork all day to pull for tacos al pastor and slow cooked Osso Buco – and it’s only early October!

If you follow Sips or remember The Wine Experience then you know that my personal food and wine pairing mantra is “drink what you like.”  Well I like putting many of the tastes of Fall foods together with reds that just seem to complete the package.  Here’s what I mean:

  • Chili and Zin. Zin adds a dash of peppery flavor and has the attitude to stand up to the multitude of ingredients, especially the tomato and peppers. Other choice: Primitivo.
  • Beef stew and Merlot. Merlot’s jammy flavor seems ideal for the supple gravy and soft beef chunks, as well as the sweetness of the carrots. Other choice: Cabernet.
  • Baked chicken and sausage with Rhones. The Grenache based blends of the southern Rhone bridge the mild flavored chicken and the spiced sausage.  This one is interesting because we actually use white wine in cooking but I like the way the red pulls it all together when it’s time to eat. Other choice Sangiovese.
  • Thick cut grilled lamb chops with Cabernet. The tannins of the Cab are like an exclamation point to the richness of the lamb. Other choice Tempranillo.
  • Braised short ribs with Shiraz. I love the fruit and spice with the meatiness. Other choice Merlot.
  • Osso Buco and Tempranillo. I like the acidity of the Tempranillo with the deep hearty flavor of the slow cooked veal shank. Other choice Nebbiolo.
  • Tacos and Malbec. Si.

I think it’s time to start cooking – then pick some wine from our Sips pages for Every Day, Guest and Splurge wine choices.  And as your special treat, here is the Chicken and Sausage recipe!

Cristina Pastina’s Chicken and Sausage
Serves 6
Note:  Your choice on the chicken.  You can use a whole chicken cut up or six split breast if you prefer just white meat.

Ingredients:
6 split chicken breasts (bone in)
4 Italian sausages, cut in thirds
6 medium sized Yukon gold potatoes, quartered
4 large carrots, peeled and cut to large chunks (3 or 4 per carrot)
1 large onion, halved and sliced
½ cup olive oil
1 cup dry white wine
½ cup seasoned bread crumbs
3 cloves garlic, minced
Kosher salt
Black pepper
1 tbs. oregano

Preparation:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees

  1. In a large baking dish, pour olive oil and coat the bottom.  Add the chicken and roll around to cover with oil.  Arrange chicken skin side up around the dish. You may use two baking dishes if more room is needed but this will add to the cooking time.
  2. Pour the wine over the chicken.
  3. Salt and pepper each breast.
  4. Sprinkle oregano, garlic and bread crumbs over each.
  5. Arrange sausage pieces, potatoes and carrots around the dish and between the chicken.
  6. Cover all with the onion slices.
  7. Loosely cover the dish with aluminum foil and bake in the oven for 1 hour.  Remove the foil and bake an additional 30 – 45 minutes to desired doneness – cooking time can vary… the tighter it’s packed the slower it cooks (don’t burn, but make sure the carrots and potatoes are cooked tender)  chicken should be browned by now…if not you may broil for a moment…but watch carefully.
  8. Serve.

Knowing Bordeaux – Part 1

Bordeaux.  If there is one word in wine that captures the culture and costliness, savior faire and snobbery, history and histrionics of wine this is it.  There are other parts of the world where wine has been made more anciently but none where wine has come to so be exquisitely defined.  Bordeaux truly has been the ‘pebble in the pond’ from which wine popularity and appreciation have spread outward (largely thanks to the British – but that’s another story).  Yet to many who like to drink and enjoy wine it remains somewhat confusing and inaccessible.  Let’s change that by starting with a little journey through the region.

Reds are the dominant wines in Bordeaux with Cabernet Sauvignon getting most of the attention, but Merlot is actually more widely planted. The red wines are blends of the ‘noble grapes’ of Bordeaux – Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot.  Usually two or more of these grapes are in the bottle but you won’t see them listed on the label.  The white wines are Sauvignon Blanc blended with Semillon.  The French don’t label by the grape type so this is why it’s good to know a bit about the region in general and each of the particular areas within it.  You can then know what to look for in the store and how to buy smarter.

Knowing Bordeaux begins with some basic geography.  The geography of Bordeaux directly influences the wine in the bottle.  Bordeaux is located near the Atlantic Ocean in the southwestern corner of France.  The ocean plays a very strong role in the wine of the region because of the cool and chilly dampness and rain that is typical during the growing season.  However, the vines get some moderating protection from a coastal forest so the extremes are not as significant as in other maritime growing environments.

The region is bisected by two major rivers which then join into a large estuary.  The Garonne River meets the Dordogne River near the city of Bordeaux and together they make up the Gironde – the estuary that runs into the Atlantic.  These four bodies of water – ocean and three rivers – are the natural demarcation of the Bordeaux wine country, controlling climate and creating the terroir of the region.  The gravelly soils are ideal for Cabernet and the more fertile areas help Merlot thrive.

The eastern side of the Dordogne and Gironde is known as the “Right Bank.”  It’s here that Merlot based wines are predominant. At the center is the village of St. Emilion and scattered though the broader area are Pomerol, Fronsac and others.  This is the Libournais, so named after the city of Libourne.

fotoBORDELAIS-mapa-post-sobre-cata-Bordeaux-1140x904

To the west of the Garonne and Gironde is the “Left Bank.”  This is home to the most famous wines of Bordeaux from the chateaux of the Medoc north of the town of Bordeaux – St. Estephe, Pauillac, St. Julien, Margaux – and Graves to the south.  The Left Bank wines are driven by Cabernet Sauvignon, which needs to be hardy in that maritime climate and makes wine that is tannic, structured and very age-worthy.  In Graves it is also where the white wines of Bordeaux are prominent. Then tucked away near the banks of the Garonne is Sauternes and the world famous dessert wine of Chateau D’Yquem.

Between the rivers is a fertile triangle of land known as Entre-Deux-Mers, literally ‘between the waters.’  This is the breadbasket of Bordeaux wine where there is big production and a high volume of every day drinking Merlot based wines.  There aren’t a lot of Entre-Deux-Mers wines on our shelves, but they are a staple throughout France.

In future posts I’ll get into more detail on both the Right and Left Bank and the styles and characters of the wines we’ll find there, but here’s a little sampling to wet your tastebuds!

Every Day Sip
2012 Chateau Cap de Faugeres Castillon Cotes de Bordeaux $18

2012 Francois Thienpont Rouge Lalande de Pomerol $18

2012 Chateau Bellevue Peycharneau Bordeaux Superieur $14

Guest Sip
2012 Chateau d’Armailhac Pauillac $50

2012 Chateau Sansonnet Saint Emilion $36

2012 Chateau Cantenac Brown Margaux $48

Splurge Sip
2012 Chateau Pape Clement Pessac Leognan $100

1999 d’Yquem $100 (auction price) for half bottle 375ml

Full Bodied Reds

BODY is one of the most common descriptors of wine – and I think most of us know instinctively what it means.  It’s easy to identify with.  Some wines are thin.  Some are rich and full.  Others can be described as ‘muscular’ or ‘flabby.’  Sounds like people doesn’t it?

Well BODY is really about how the wine feels in your mouth and much of that has to so with how much alcohol the wine has, and of course the grape variety as well as the wine making style.  For a lot of wine drinkers, full bodied wines are the wine of choice.  After all, they tend to pack the most punch per sip.  We love the roundness of the flavor and heft of the wine.  Americans have never been accused of embracing delay in gratification in anything, have we?  I also think that we have learned to seek out these taste experiences in the US since we gravitate to bigger flavor foods.  How many of us were raised on a meat and potatoes diet? Lots of dairy.  Burgers?  Not a lot of nuance there.

And then there is the “New World” style of winemaking and the very popular rating scales used in the media.  The New World style, of which California’s influence is the most notable, is fruit forward, mostly drink-it-now, driven by the grape variety and the winemaking.  More extraction and higher alcohol are common.  A highly respected and followed publication, Robert Parker’s The Wine Advocate, became known for higher ratings of big and powerful wines. Higher ratings mean higher prices and greater sales – and more wineries jumped on the upfront style. So it’s no wonder that fuller bodied wines seem to dominate what we drink most.

What are these wines?  Most are red, but there are a couple of whites (particularly Chardonnay and Viognier, although we’re talking red today). If you like it full and bold here’s what to look for, with one caveat – one size does not fit all.  Each of the following cover the spectrum of weight and body.  Consider these a place to start.

Cabernet Sauvignon: In my post, “A Taste of Cabernet” I wrote, “Cabernet is a conundrum – big, bold and powerful as well as elegant, refined and beautiful.”  Cabernet has it all – structure, weight and depth to go along with its finesse and age-worthiness.  It fills your mouth with bursts of dark fruit and plum, tobacco and leather, cedar and mint – all kinds of layered flavors.  California, Chile and Australia lead with the fuller bodied styles dominated by fruit and drinkability. Bordeaux wines can also be considered full bodied for sure, but to me where they fall is much more dependent on the specific area of Bordeaux and the nature of the blend in the bottle.

Syrah/Shiraz:  Syrah from the Northern Rhone – Cote Rotie (the “Roasted Slope”), Hermitage and St. Joseph, and the Aussie Shiraz are midnight dark and intense with blackberry, currant and smoke. The tannins are softer than Cab.  I love Syrah/Shiraz with lamb and beef.  More Syrah is coming out of California too.

Petite Sirah: Not the same as the above, it’s its own grape and it is a chewer!  It’s on the shelves on it’s own from California and is frequently blended into Zinfandel to add punch to that wine. Inky black and bold.

Zinfandel:  Much Zin is really more medium bodied, but there are bolder styles driven by the blacker fruits, as opposed to red, and higher alcohol, as well as those with some Petite Sirah in the blend.  The “old vine” estate and single vineyard Zins are typically fuller bodied.

Merlot: Yes, Merlot is usually fuller bodied.  But it tends to get overlooked by its softness, its less tannic structure.  To appreciate Merlot’s full bodied appeal have a cheddar cheeseburger.

Malbec: Malbec has come into its own in Argentina.  It’s softer than Cab and to me has more of an edge to it than Merlot.  It’s affordable and approachable – a good choice to have on hand at home as your go-to glass of red.

To get into all the potential full bodied reds and the iterations of blends and indigenous grape varieties would turn this post into a tome!  One thing to take away – if the wine is 14.5% alcohol or higher you can be pretty sure that it will be a full bodied sip.

But know that the truth is in what YOU taste, and in what you expect out of the wine and the time you’re enjoying it.  I don’t like rules about wine.  I like guides that leave up to me to decide what I like or don’t like.  And the fun is in exploring it all.

Not a bad way to sip.

Burgers and Bordeaux

IMG_2624I’ll bet that’s a title you didn’t expect.  Most often when we see “Bordeaux” we go right to the higher end, well known, cellerable (I made that word up) and expensive wines that the region is known for.  But there many more terrific wines from Bordeaux that are great for everyday – white and red.  Today we’ll chat about red since I had a juicy Swiss cheese burger hot off the grill last night along with a tasty wine from Castillon-Cotes de Bordeaux.  And it was perfect burger wine that was only about $15.

The most basic thing to know about Bordeaux is learning your left from your right.  Okay – sorry for being a smart***.  But the wines from the Left, or west of the Gironde and Garonne Rivers are Cabernet driven, while those from the Right, or east of the Gironde and Dordogne are Merlot driven.  Then there is a large triangular area called Entre-Deux-Mers, literally ‘between the seas’ where there are higher production, mostly white wines. The reason to be aware of the Left or Right back locations is that those Right bank Merlot based wines tend to be more readily drinkable if you prefer softer, less tannic wine for everyday.

Here’s a factoid for you – Merlot is actually the most widely planted grape in Bordeaux.  So much for the stigma it seems to still carry here (see my post on Much Maligned Merlot for more on that).  So if you would like to try some good value, easy to drink Right bank Bordeaux look for the names of the region on the label. None of these are typically 100% Merlot but rather a blend of the permitted Bordeaux grapes which include Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, Carmenere and Malbec in addition to Merlot but most of the wines from the Right bank are at least half Merlot.

Here’s a list for you to take into the wine shop:

  • Blaye-Cotes de Bordeaux
  • Francs-Cotes de Bordeaux
  • Castillon-Cotes de Bordeaux
  • Cadillac-Cotes de Bordeaux
  • Sainte-Foy-Bordeaux
  • Graves-de-Vayres
  • Cotes de Bourg
  • Fronsac
  • Canon-Fronsac

There are also the wines and communes where you can find the most high end offerings from Pomerol and St. Emilion.  The main city on the Right bank is Libourne so this region is also known as the Libournais. But in addition to the fine wines of Pomerol and the Grand Cru wines of St. Emilion there are the so-called satellites which offer some really good values:

  • Saint-Georges-Saint-Emilion
  • Montagne-Saint-Emilion
  • Lussac-Saint-Emilion
  • Puisseguin-Saint-Emilion, and,
  • Lalande-de-Pomerol

Over time we’ll explore more of Bordeaux, but now that I know my Right from my Left I’m heading back to the wine store to get more of my burger wine!

Much Maligned Merlot

I feel sorry for Merlot.  Here’s a grape that is one of the most widely planted in the world which you’ll find in some of the best wine made and yet it’s completely dissed.  You would think this grape the French call the “little blackbird” would get more respect.  Those of you of a certain age can insert your favorite  Rodney Dangerfield saying here (mine, by the way is “Come on. While we’re young!” from Caddyshack, but I digress).

Merlot had turned into a bar pour as in “I’ll have the Merlot” since people viewed it as a step up from “I’ll have a glass of red.”  To be sure, there was a lot of very average, grapey, flabby merlot out there on the shelves – then the movie Sideways came out in 2004 and really trashed it.  Merlot’s reputation and sales plummeted and, worse yet, it became very uncool.  Ironically, the star wine of the movie was not the Pinot Noir that the characters gushed about, but the long-saved and much anticipated bottle that the lead, Miles, was just waiting for the right moment to drink.  It was mostly Merlot!  The wine, Cheval Blanc, from the right bank of Bordeaux between the villages of Pomerol and St. Emilion is comprised of a blend that is half Merlot.

But, hey folks, that was eleven years ago!  Its time to get past it and rediscover Merlot.  It’s time to R-E-S-P-E-C-T (insert your favorite Aretha song here) Merlot.  And it’s ready to drink now.  Merlot is usually soft and approachable, with no bitterness or sharpness.

Merlot is the most planted grape in France, but usually you have to know the village or region to know what you are buying.  The home of Merlot is the so-called Right Bank of Bordeaux, which is to the east of that city. Look for the names Pomerol, St. Emilion, Fronsac, Blaye, Cotes de Bourg, Castillon and their combinations on the label.  These wines are typically blends that are mostly Merlot. They tend to be less fruit in your face dominant than American Merlot and a little more astringent or tannic (which people describe as tight).  American and other new world Merlot usually are very fruit driven, meaning that you’ll find lush flavors of dark cherry, blueberry or plum and often some chocolate mocha when you take a sip.

You can enjoy Merlot with lots of foods.  My personal favorites are a cheddar cheeseburger or some thick pork chops right off the grill.  And it’s out there in all price ranges.  If you want to buy the Cheval Blanc (the latest vintage is about $500 per bottle), let me know and I’ll be right over – but there’s lots to choose from between $10 and $25, with some truly exceptional wines up to about $60.

Everyday Sip:  2012 Columbia Crest “H3” Horse Heaven Hills Merlot, Columbia Valley $12
A lot of wine for this price. Horse Haven Hills is a subregion of the Columbia Valley putting out some outstanding wines. Black cherries and cocoa.  Easy to drink and versatile.

Guest Sip:  2012 Ferrari Carano Merlot, Sonoma County $25
Dark fruit with a little vanilla accent. Lush wine that’s very food friendly.

Splurge Sip:  2012 Pride Mountain Vineyards  Merlot $60
With apologies to Emeril – BAM!  This is a big juicy Merlot that shows off what this grape can be.  Bold plummy fruitiness with a dash of mocha.  Ripe and full bodied.